RV Investigator on the Derwent River

How to apply for sea time

This short video provides an overview of the Marine National Facility and how to apply for sea time on board the research vessel Investigator.

Primary Applications for MNF Granted Voyages in 2018-19 are now open. Visit the Primary Applications page in the MNF Granted Voyages (GV) menu (left) for further information.

Transcript

[Water sound plays and text appears:  Marine National Facility]

[Music plays and image changes to show a front view and side view of the Investigator on the ocean and then the image changes to show a male looking through the bridge window and the camera zooms in on droplets on the window]

[Image changes to show Ian Poiner talking to the camera]

Ian Poiner: Hi, my name’s Ian Poiner and I have the great pleasure of chairing the Marine National Facility Steering Committee.

[Images flash through of a view looking over the bow of the ship, a gull, the side of the Investigator, an ocean view and the camera pans over the surface of the water and then underwater and text appears: shutterstock]

With over 14 million square kilometres of Australia underwater our marine estate is the third largest in the globe.

[Image changes to show fish swimming on the ocean bed and then the image changes to show Ian Poiner talking to the camera and text appears: videohive]

It is the heart, heritage and economic future of our nation.

[Images flash through of a marine platform, a ship, a yacht, a crane, a male looking through the bridge window, a male hooking up a rope, a crate being lifted by a crane and the bow of the Investigator cutting through the water]

Currently marine industries contribute over 42 billion to the Australian economy and by the year 2025 our blue economy will contribute in excess of $100 billion dollars per year to Australia. 

[Image changes to show the side of the ship, fish leaping out of the water, a group of researchers deploying a piece of marine equipment and a corer]

The Marine National Facility was established in 1984 to provide the blue water research capability to support that estate. 

[Image changes to show an image of the RV Investigator and text appears: 94 metres, 18.5 metres]

The jewel in the crown of the Marine National Facility is the R.V. Investigator. 

[Image changes to show a side view of a model of the R.V. Investigator and a box appears with 60 people symbols and then the image changes to show the inside of the rooms on the ship]

Ninety-four metres long, it can accommodate 40 scientists and support staff for voyages up to 60 days in duration. 

[Image changes to show a side view of the Investigator on the ocean and then the image changes to show a view of a corer under water]

With a range of 10,000 nautical miles the Investigator can explore the deepest and most remote parts of our ocean and overlying atmosphere. 

[Image changes to show Ian Poiner talking to the camera and then images flash through of a corer being drawn to the surface of the water, Ian Poiner talking to the camera, the ship’s laboratory and then the camera pans around the laboratory]

From the tropics in the north to the edge of Antarctica in the south, the Investigator can support atmospheric, oceanographic, biological and geoscience research and it’s the first Australian research vessel with dedicated laboratories that can study the interaction between the oceans and the atmosphere. 

[Image changes to show Ian Poiner talking to the camera and then the image changes to show the mast of the Investigator]

It is also one of the most acoustically quiet vessels in the world. 

[Images flash through of a net being dropped into the ocean, a school of tuna swimming under water, researchers looking at computer screens and then the camera zooms in on the computer screen map of the sea bed]

This helps maximise the performance of equipment used to monitor marine ecosystems and to map the sea floor and sea beds. 

[Image changes to show Ian Poiner talking to the camera]

Investigator offers exciting opportunities for researchers. 

[Images flash through of two researchers talking on the deck, a female researcher in the cabin, researchers gathered around a computer screen, a researcher in the engine room and researchers in the laboratory]

The application for sea time is a merit based process open to Australian based researchers employed by Australian research organisations and their international collaborators. 

[Image changes to show data on a computer screen and then the image changes to show Ian Poiner talking to the camera]

An independent science committee assesses the science excellence and track record of sea time applicants.  An independent advisory panel assesses the national benefit of applications.

[Image changes to show a view of the bow of the Investigator and then images flash through of a weather balloon on the deck of the ship, the Investigator on the ocean, a researcher looking through the window, an island and a group of researchers looking through the window]

Interested parties that aren’t able to use the ship as part of its’ 180 day voyage schedule may still be eligible for sea time outside of these dates where we have a range of opportunities available. 

[Image changes to show Ian Poiner talking to the camera]

I’d encourage anyone interested in using the ship to visit the Marine National Facility website where they can find out more information.

[Text appears: www.mnf.csiro.au]

[CSIRO logo and text appears: Marine National Facility, supporting, enabling and inspiring marine science, owned and operated by CSIRO on behalf of Australia]

Updated: 20 June 2016